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How can I be a better husband?

March 11, 2015

I guess my reputation for being a little on the verbose side, precedes me! Well, that’s okay. I think I can offer you a little advice that will go a long way. First, let me tell you that everything I’m going to say comes straight out of God’s Word. So, look up 1 Peter 3:7-10 and read on.

Do you know what the human heart craves for more than anything else? Intimacy. Seek to be intimate with your wife verbally, spiritually, emotionally, intellectually, and socially. That means you’re going to have to sacrifice a little bit of your self, or at least your self-protection. Let down those barriers and let your wife in your life.

And while you’re doing that, don’t forget to understand her side of things. Seek to put on her shoes when you get into a misunderstanding. Men and women talk and think differently. Don’t disintegrate because of the differences, celebrate and work through those differences by trying to see her side of things and talk her talk.

Most of all, show honor to your wife. View her as a priceless gift, and grant her a position worthy of great respect. If she’s not honored by you, while she is being honored by others, you’ve got the making of divorce. Do you know that most marriages are not wrecked by a blow-out but a slow leak when husbands fail to honor their wives. Put her up on a pedestal and keep her there. My wife says she doesn’t want to be equal with me. She’s not coming down for anything!

Now for some action... Praise her in front of your children, your friends, your business associates. Tell her how precious she is to you. Then, tell her why. Women love specifics. They’re not bottom-line thinkers like us. Thank her for her character. Thank her for her patience with the children. Thank her for the way that she handles the family budget. Thank her for her godliness.

If you seek to do these few things, it will go a long way in making you a better husband.

Taken from Adrian Rogers' weekly newspaper column. Used by permission. 2001, The Commercial Appeal.